Jul. 21st, 2017 12:31 pm
the_rck: (Default)
[personal profile] the_rck
Scott's response on giving away the crock pot was "Hallelujah!!" We just have to figure out an easy way to transport it. Our cleaning lady is thinking that she'll bring a sturdy bag and take one piece a week. I think the base the lid are light enough to go together, but the stoneware inserts are really, really heavy.

I ended up not writing yesterday. The afternoon and early evening got devoured by insurance related stuff. There's a receipt I can't find that I'm about 60% sure I submitted for a claim, but I can't find any indication on the Aetna statements that they ever got it. I also haven't managed to find it in any of the places I keep those receipts.

Then, while we were eating dinner, our power went out for about an hour and a half. Scott and I decided to go out in search of some sort of dessert, but the first place we tried had too long a wait for seating. The second had already closed for the evening. We went to Plum Market for the half price baked goods and then ended up at Wendy's for frosties. After we had paid, they handed them to us with straws, telling us that they were out of spoons and that, if we really wanted, they could give us forks instead of straws.

Cordelia's pediatrician told me that I will have to talk to the sports medicine people about guidelines for what she can safely do in gym class. I really hope they don't need to see her in order to do that because there's pretty much zero chance that they could see her for that before October, not the way non-emergency appointments go at the U.

Jul. 21st, 2017 12:30 pm
the_rck: (Default)
[personal profile] the_rck
I'm looking for suggestions for story idea generators that might appeal to Cordelia. She says she wants to write but has no ideas. Anything I suggest is, naturally, too parentally tainted to be interesting, so I thought maybe some of those generators that slap ridiculous ideas together might help.

I don't play with them much, so I have no idea what's out there or how to find them.
copperbadge: (Default)
[personal profile] copperbadge
I still have to review Extra Virginity as well, but I actually liked that one, so it will take longer to compose….

One of the things I did get done yesterday between work, the ball game, and the Epic Sunburn, was finish a slim book of short stories called A City Equal to My Desire by James Sallis. This wasn’t a book that was recommended to me, which means I don’t have to feel bad about truly disliking it. I found it in a keyword search on the library website for books about ukuleles, and it has a short story called Ukulele And The World’s Pain, which admittedly was one of the better stories in the book despite still not being very good.

From what I can tell, he did pick the best story out of the book to develop into a novel, “Drive”, but it is very obviously unfinished in short-story form. Sallis has a couple of ongoing problems in the short story collection, one of which is that he tends to skip the vital information you need in order to know what the fuck is going on. And not in a “the blanks slowly get filled in” way, or in a “your imagination is more terrible” way (though there is a little of that) but just in a way where like…he says something that you understand to be vital to the story but which is missing context, then spends like a page describing the fucking diner someone’s sitting in, and by then any context forthcoming doesn’t get linked back. It’s like being in the middle of a paragraph when you hit the photo plates in an older book – yes the photos are very interesting thank you but I need to finish the thought you were sharing with me before I go back and look at them. I think maybe he thinks this is challenging the reader but it’s not, it’s just annoying and makes what are otherwise interesting premises totally opaque. I shouldn’t need to work this hard for a story about a hit man who decides not to kill a politician. 

If the book had a more cohesive theme in terms of the stories, it might be more readable – he clearly enjoys building worlds and then doesn’t quite know what to do with them once he’s built them, so if this was an entire book of “weird and different worlds” ala Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities, I would buy in more fully and I think he would have put a little more elbow in. But it’s not. It’s mostly “here’s a really interesting world and a person living in squalor in it does something while being in it”. Also he appears to be fascinated by describing things that are shaped like pi. And a lot of times it feels like he read a wikipedia article on something and wanted to share some knowledge, so he just kind of built a half-assed story around his wikiwander. 

And all of this I would probably let go if say, it was something I was noticing in a fanfic writer, or someone who was just starting out, or someone I felt was genuinely trying to get a point across. But there’s this inexplicable sense of arrogance to the collection, a sort of smugness to it that in professional writers drives me up the goddamn wall. Stephen King sometimes falls into the same trap, where it feels like the author believes they don’t have to respect their readers because they are The Writer. 

The thing about volumes of short stories is that you keep reading it because sometimes there is a real gem. And there are one or two good stories in the volume, but I don’t know if they’re worth the rest of it. 

So my review I guess is mostly me being annoyed, but it boils down to “If you like short stories in the SFF Noir genre, give it a whirl, but if you’re bored with a story none of them get better, so feel free to skip to the next one.” 

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havocthecat: the lady of shalott (Default)
[personal profile] havocthecat
For anyone who might be interested, Pixar has Pixar in a Box on Khan Academy.

It's primarily directed at film writing, but I think it can be used for all types of narrative storytelling. I've been listening to The Art of Storytelling video series.

It starts out with "We are all storytellers," (I'm there still) which I think is an admirable point and has a number of their creators talking about their amateur efforts and how they got started, like Betty and Veronica fashion fanart. :)

It leads to characterization and story structure, and while I don't know that visual language is going to be terribly helpful to us print writers, it might give good ideas for descriptions of scenery to go around dialogue. There are also lessons and activities that you can do, should you choose.

(I can't find closed captions on Khan Academy, though. That's my one quibble thus far.)

One of my favorite pieces of writing advice is still this graphic: Pixar's 22 Rules of Storytelling.

No, I'm not saying they have to be YOUR rules too. I'm just saying I find the list as a useful set of way to help me go through one of my stories and figure out what's not working and what I need to do to make it work. Or sometimes, for me to just let go and stopy worrying at something, and maybe come back to it later.

Jul. 21st, 2017 03:19 pm
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[personal profile] tree_and_leaf
Happy birthday, [personal profile] coughingbear!
author_by_night: (cool_large)
[personal profile] author_by_night
Since DW butchered my earlier post, I'm trying to re-post. (Take three. Sigh. I'm so sorry, guys.)

Not 100% sure why I'm being nostalgic - I've grown up, after all. I'm not the slightly naive 22 year old girl I was ten years ago. But I also think part of growing up is realizing some things will always stay with you. Besides, adulthood sucks sometimes, and one needs a retreat to simpler times.

So even if I feel I should be talking about properly adult things instead of squeeing over a book series I used to really love, screw it, my LJ/DW's going to be nostalgic today. :P

Read more... )

Apparently I have the day to myself, so I may concoct a few drabbles or... something later.

Jul. 21st, 2017 12:43 pm
legionseagle: (Default)
[personal profile] legionseagle
Happy Birthday [personal profile] coughingbear

Linkin Park

Jul. 21st, 2017 02:04 am
ericadawn16: (Nostalgic)
[personal profile] ericadawn16
Technically, Linkin Park started when I was in middle and high school but I don't remember them being everywhere until college. That's when I had burned copies of Hybrid Theory and Reanimation. I played the second one for my mom I still remember how she said she enjoyed the instrumental pieces the most. Just a few months ago, I pointed out an early Linkin Park song and she didn't recognize it as them.



I can't remember now how it came about. My mom either saw them perform on a show or had WMNF talk it up repeatedly but "A Thousand Suns" was one of the few CDS that she bought new and not because it was on sale or something.
It's one of the best albums...ever.

If I had to make a Top 10 album list, this one would always be there. It's practically perfect. It's melancholy but hopeful. It's full of older tales still even more relevant today. It's thoughtful but toetapping. It's just...everything.



Then, there's Transformers. One of the reasons that Age of Extinction felt off was the lack of Linkin Park which was rectified by the fifth film. This video does have a LOT of that film if you're concerned with spoilers. I always meant to see it again but the timing never worked out so I'm happy about that.



But in general...this sucks. I think everyone my age was still getting over Chris Cornell's death...the Avengers credits will never be the same...and now this. Our attitudes towards mental health suck and they kill people and we just...suck.

I guess I keep thinking of that discussion between Jack Sparrow and Hector Barbossa:

Barbossa: The world used to be a bigger place.
Jack Sparrow: The world's still the same. There's just... less in it.

SSHG Promptfest Reveal

Jul. 21st, 2017 02:43 pm
kerravonsen: Snape, Hermione: "Believe" (Snape-Hermione)
[personal profile] kerravonsen
So, the [livejournal.com profile] sshg_promptest has completed, and the reveals are up.
I made two items for the same prompt, because it was such a fabulous prompt:

Threads. As light as gossamer or spun into a thread; holding things together at the seams; yarn woven into a tapestry or the warmest blanket; twisted into string, a cord, a rope. Threads of memory or of hair. Loose threads. (prompt by [livejournal.com profile] eoforth)

First piece: Interlocking LivesSSHG Jewellery
On Etsy (more pictures, and yes, you can buy it!!!)

Second piece: Woven Threads
On Etsy (more pictures, and you can buy this one too!)

So my mother had a small stroke.

Jul. 20th, 2017 11:34 pm
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
She's talking just fine (which is great, she's a real chatterbox) and even though she has some weakness on one side, it's already improving.

And while we were gone dealing with this, the cops broke into our house to search for our escaped neighbor. Which is ridiculous - they didn't have a warrant, and they certainly didn't have probable cause, and they definitely did not have our consent to a search.

I must say, they're really pulling out all the stops here. The cops, the state troopers, a joint NY/NJ task force, a helicopter... all this for some dude who ran out of his house, handcuffed, in his undies. It's either overkill, or they're hiding something big.
starandrea: (Default)
[personal profile] starandrea
1) sleeping in a hammock
2) watching kings of con
3) clif kid z bars

Done!

Jul. 20th, 2017 07:42 pm
koshka_the_cat: (Default)
[personal profile] koshka_the_cat
I tried on the suffragette evening dress and decided against basting the skirt and bodice together. It seemed like it would work unbasted, but I pinned it anyway. Then the pins came out a little wonky, and I decided it would be fine.

I needed another tuck in the petticoat. After doing the first five nicely, I did the world's sloppiest tuck above the ruffle. I'm sure it's not the first petticoat to have a giant sloppy tuck.

Then I tried the suffragette day skirt on over the petticoat to see if it would work, and figured I may as well mark the new closures, so those are done. I moved the snap, but just added extra bars instead of moving them.

So, I think everything that has to be done is done. I still want a new hat, but...

Before and After!

Jul. 20th, 2017 05:20 pm
koshka_the_cat: (Default)
[personal profile] koshka_the_cat
2017-07-20_05-20-42 IMG_20170720_171249

Before and after--no tucks and tucks!

I hate making tucks, but as I was doing it, I just reminded myself that adding tucks to a petticoat is much faster than making a new petticoat. And they're pretty!

I think this is short enough to wear with the suffragette evening dress now. And it should be a good length for the day skirt too, so I can pack less. The petticoat and a corset cover is much better for packing than a petticoat and a princess slip! And my new goal is to pack as little as possible so I can take as much extra stash fabric as possible...

Now, closures on the suffragette evening skirt...

Jul. 20th, 2017 03:39 pm
the_rck: (Default)
[personal profile] the_rck
I'm feeling so very, very overheated right now. I know that part of the problem is that the only way I can get caffeine right this moment is by making and drinking hot tea (cold brewed will take about twenty hours, so it's not an immediate option). Well, I could spend a couple of hours going to the store to buy something. Decidedly not worth it to.

I'm at home alone right this moment. Cordelia had a volunteer shift at the downtown library this morning and plans to meet up with friends at the Traverwood library in the afternoon. She'll go home with them, and we'll pick her up at 9:30, after movie night with her friends. Their current plan is to watch Grease.

A couple of nights ago, I cooked the remaining ground turkey in the instant pot with some great northern beans and turkey bacon. I added chicken broth and some herbs/spices. I think I misjudged that because it almost gives me reflux. It doesn't actually; I can just tell that I'm near the tipping point.

I've managed the two most urgent phone calls, but neither matter is resolved yet. The second call is almost certainly going to end up with me having to call a different doctor's office about parameters/limitations for Cordelia's knee in high school gym. I was hoping not to have to because that's the doctor that wanted us to do surgery. The first call went to voicemail, so nothing's resolved until I actually manage to talk to the person.

The other call I should make is to Shar Instruments to ask about buying a viola and whether or not we can do it on installments. Of course, buying a viola kind of requires us to be fairly sure Cordelia's done growing. She's only grown half an inch in the last year and a half, and she's in the height range where all the women in my family tend to fall (5'1 to 5'3"). It's just that everyone in Scott's family is tall, so Cordelia's still hoping she'll get taller.

I'm trying to decide whether filling out insurance forms is more important than starting to write right this moment. My procrastination levels are set to 11 at the moment. The forms are important, very much so, but would there be any harm in having Scott fill the dratted things out this evening?

I have given our old crock pot to our cleaning lady. She'll actually use it, and we haven't touched it in years. The stoneware inserts are really too heavy for me at this point. I don't think this is the sort of thing that's worth holding onto for the years until Cordelia moves out and might want it. Plus, I'm pretty sure she'd rather have an Instant Pot instead.
author_by_night: (cool_large)
[personal profile] author_by_night
I said I was going to do more Harry Potter nostalgia. Well, the fact that this post is Harry Potter related is nostalgic, I suppose, but mostly it's just your everyday putting characters from other media into Hogwarts Houses. :P

Here is my assessment. Feel free to add your own input. I tried to do this humorously, as opposed to doing it as Srs Bsns, although there's also analysis to it. 

Read more... )


Again, let me know who you would Sort, and where. Also, feel free to request any other fictional Sortings!

thewayne: (Default)
[personal profile] thewayne
Anyone who doesn't expect Trump facilities to NOT get hit more in coming years raise your hand. Bueller? Anyone? It's been documented that Trump's facilities have lousy IT practices and terrible WiFi security, but hotels are particularly problematic. American hotels seem to be stuck with using card swiping technology rather than ECV chip readers, which greatly increase security through strong encryption. Until they upgrade, we'll be seeing hotel breeches regularly.

https://krebsonsecurity.com/2017/07/trump-hotels-hit-by-3rd-card-breach-in-2-years/

Poem of the week

Jul. 20th, 2017 08:09 am
cmcmck: (Default)
[personal profile] cmcmck
 Sometimes a poem is just so bad that it is absolutely wonderful.

This is other half's favourite McGonagall poem :o)



The Funeral of the German Emperor

YE sons of Germany, your noble Emperor William now is dead.
Who oft great armies to battle hath led;
He was a man beloved by his subjects all,
Because he never tried them to enthral.

The people of Germany have cause now to mourn,
The loss of their hero, who to them will ne’er return;
But his soul I hope to Heaven has fled away,
To the realms of endless bliss for ever and aye.

He was much respected throughout Europe by the high and the low,
And all over Germany people’s hearts are full of woe;
For in the battlefield he was a hero bold,
Nevertheless, a lover of peace, to his credit be it told.

’Twas in the year of 1888, and on March the 16th day,
That the peaceful William’s remains were conveyed away
To the royal mausoleum of Charlottenburg, their last resting-place,
The God-fearing man that never did his country disgrace.

The funeral service was conducted in the cathedral by the court chaplain, Dr. Kogel,
Which touched the hearts of his hearers, as from his lips it fell,
And in conclusion he recited the Lord’s Prayer
In the presence of kings, princes, dukes, and counts assembled there.

And at the end of the service the infantry outside fired volley after volley,
While the people inside the cathedral felt melancholy,
As the sound of the musketry smote upon the ear,
In honour of the illustrous William. whom they loved most dear.

Then there was a solemn pause as the kings and princes took their places,
Whilst the hot tears are trickling down their faces,
And the mourners from shedding tears couldn’t refrain;
And in respect of the good man, above the gateway glared a bituminous flame.

Then the coffin was placed on the funeral car,
By the kings and princes that came from afar;
And the Crown Prince William heads the procession alone,
While behind him are the four heirs-apparent to the throne.

Then followed the three Kings of Saxony, and the King of the Belgians also,
Together with the Prince of Wales, with their hearts full of woe,
Besides the Prince of Naples and Prince Rudolph of Austria were there,
Also the Czarevitch, and other princes in their order I do declare.

And as the procession passes the palace the blinds are drawn completely,
And every house is half hidden with the sable drapery;
And along the line of march expansive arches were erected,
While the spectators standing by seemed very dejected.

And through the Central Avenue, to make the decorations complete,
There were pedestals erected, rising fourteen to fifteen feet,
And at the foot and top of each pedestal were hung decorations of green bay,
Also beautiful wreaths and evergreen festoons all in grand array.

And there were torches fastened on pieces of wood stuck in the ground;
And as the people gazed on the weird-like scene, their silence was profound;
And the shopkeepers closed their shops, and hotel-keepers closed in the doorways,
And with torchlight and gaslight, Berlin for once was all ablaze.

The authorities of Berlin in honour of the Emperor considered it no sin,
To decorate with crape the beautiful city of Berlin;
Therefore Berlin I declare was a city of crape,
Because few buildings crape decoration did escape.

First in the procession was the Emperor’s bodyguard,
And his great love for them nothing could it retard;
Then followed a squadron of the hussars with their band,
Playing “Jesus, Thou my Comfort,” most solemn and grand.

And to see the procession passing the sightseers tried their best,
Especially when the cavalry hove in sight, riding four abreast;
Men and officers with their swords drawn, a magnificent sight to see
In the dim sun’s rays, their burnished swords glinting dimly.

Then followed the footguards with slow and solemn tread,
Playing the “Dead March in Saul,” most appropriate for the dead;
And behind them followed the artillery, with four guns abreast,
Also the ministers and court officials dressed in their best.

The whole distance to the grave was covered over with laurel and bay,
So that the body should be borne along smoothly all the way;
And the thousands of banners in the procession were beautiful to view,
Because they were composed of cream-coloured silk and light blue.

There were thousands of thousands of men and women gathered there,
And standing ankle deep in snow, and seemingly didn’t care
So as they got a glimpse of the funeral car,
Especially the poor souls that came from afar.

And when the funeral car appeared there was a general hush,
And the spectators in their anxiety to see began to crush;
And when they saw the funeral car by the Emperor’s charger led,
Every hat and cap was lifted reverently from off each head.

And as the procession moved on to the royal mausoleum,
The spectators remained bareheaded and seemingly quite dumb;
And as the coffin was borne into its last resting-place,
Sorrow seemed depicted in each one’s face.

And after the burial service the mourners took a last farewell
Of the noble-hearted William they loved so well;
Then rich and poor dispersed quietly that were assembled there,
While two batteries of field-guns fired a salute which did rend the air
In honour of the immortal hero they loved so dear,
The founder of the Fatherland Germany, that he did revere.












Children's fiction mystery book

Jul. 20th, 2017 12:16 am
findthatbook: A pile of books. (Default)
[personal profile] nursingqueen posting in [community profile] findthatbook
I have been going crazy for years wondering what the name of this book is:

A girl is taking a bath and closes her eyes and then is being strangled. After she survived being strangled, she finds herself in a forest. She has slipped into another dimension. She has slipped out of this world into another world. And the girl that was in that world is in her tub in our world. Her boyfriend and boyfriend's uncle realize that isn't her and so they have to go into a hole in space to go and rescue her.

Done!

Jul. 19th, 2017 09:14 pm
koshka_the_cat: (Default)
[personal profile] koshka_the_cat
The beach pajamas are done! I even secured the threads on the ends of the darts. I should probably whip the seam allowances, but eh.

On to more little things! Except for wanting another spring corset (with different straps), everything now is small.

Mid-July Update

Jul. 19th, 2017 09:29 pm
everchangingmuse: oozora yuuhi looking thoughtful (yuuhi pondering)
[personal profile] everchangingmuse
So much has happened in the last few days, I can't limit a post to just one topic. So, in no particular order:

1. My sister got married! We went down last Friday to meet family and do the rehearsal dinner. It was amazing to see my extended family again! Rooming with my brother and his girlfriend...not so much. I got maybe 3 hours of sleep between Friday and Saturday, due to an incident. I was up at 4:40 Saturday morning, so I could go pick up my sister and her maid of honor and get them to the salon for their 6am appointment. We stopped at Starbucks to pick up drinks, and once I'd gotten them and their things settled, I went back out to pick up donuts for the bridal party (and me!). I also had to run out and pick up a full clothes steamer - the travel-sized one they had wasn't robust enough to steam her wedding dress. She offered to pay me back for it, but we've wanted a steamer for a while, and her wedding provided an excuse.

We got her to the venue and into her dress, and the ceremony was gorgeous. My sister was gorgeous. She was beaming and her eyes smiled as much as her mouth. Her fiance was nervous, but just as excited as she was. I got very misty eyed, but couldn't quite cry, because they both were so happy and so very obviously in love. I didn't end up crying till my dad's speech at the reception. The reception was very fun. It started a little late, thanks to a snafu with my sister's dress - the people who'd tailored it didn't give very detailed instructions as to how to properly bustle the train - but no one noticed or cared, aside from my sister. We ate, hung out, danced - and got my parents to dance a few times! - and had a general good time. We blew bubbles at her and her husband as they left the reception, and as everyone started drifting away, my brother and I helped her maid of honor clean up.

She is currently off on her honeymoon in Europe. My sister has never been abroad, so she's going to be so excited! I was completely psyched about her wedding, and being able to help her get ready and get her off on her new phase of life made me so happy.

2. I got the wedding equivalent of "con crud". Not sure entirely what it was, but probably a combination of many, many factors. When we got back to the hotel, I passed out. My wife and I didn't end up going to dinner with the family because I couldn't keep my eyes open. I woke up enough to eat a sandwich, then passed back out. I ended up throwing up before breakfast, and being completely wiped all day - to the point that my wife called the theatre where the play we'd planned to see that day, and exchanged our tickets for next weekend, then drove me home. I was still wiped out on Monday, and was getting better yesterday. I feel pretty good today, to the point that I've done things. I've walked around without getting fatigued, which was a plus. Especially given that I have my appointment tomorrow.

3. OMG NEW DOCTOR!!!!! Now that I'm not completely exhausted, as I was when I found out on Sunday, I can properly squee over the new announcement. Jodie Whittaker! Now, I have no idea who she is, since I've not seen Broadchurch, but I have yet to be truly disappointed by a Doctor. I haven't known much about any of the Doctors before seeing them in the part, honestly, so I'm just living on the squee of knowing. I have thoughts and feels, but I don't have the coherence to put them down just yet.

4. Doctor's visit tomorrow. So, I have my appointment with an oncologist-gynecologist tomorrow in the early afternoon. The office is an hour away, assuming decent traffic. I'm nervous, but I'm looking forward to the visit. It's taking action on this almost-cancer thing, and I'd rather be taking action than waiting. My mother-in-law is driving up to go with me, since my wife has to work, and my mom's too far away for a day trip. Mom's planning to come up for a few days after the surgery, whenever that will be. I'll hopefully have more information on that tomorrow.

So, yay. Life updates. Some happy, some not. I think the positive outweighs the negative right now. I'm keeping my fingers crossed that I'll still feel that way after tomorrow.
havocthecat: the lady of shalott (Default)
[personal profile] havocthecat
ETA: Logged out and gone to sleep. Good night, all!

I'm going to be trying to figure out what city I should be setting my urban fantasy in. (Or at least, what it should be an analogue to, geography-wise.)

I'll be on Discord for a couple of hours, if anyone wants to join me:

https://discord.gg/w9PK3Yg

(This time I'll remember to edit the post to say when I log off Discord!)
thewayne: (Default)
[personal profile] thewayne
It only took a week and over $750.

I don't think my dishwasher has ever been so fully loaded.

As previously posted, I discovered the water heater was leaking last week Thursday and shut it down. Unfortunately I had to go to Las Cruces for a meeting and couldn't do anything else. Friday I got a recommendation from our gas utility for a local plumber. Left a message on his voicemail requesting his services and went down to Alamogordo and bought an appropriately-sized water heater, both in gallon capacity (30, kinda small) and physical dimensions. I would've liked a larger one, but I was kind of constrained in size by its cabinet. Called the plumber and left another message informing him that I had acquired the water heater.

Saturday: no call. Sunday we went to the observatory to shower in the dorms, the dogs were taken on a bicycle adventure and much fun was had. Sunday night I did some digging for another plumber. Found one with one very good Yelp review. Looking at their web site, they had a letter posted thanking them for their services. While I didn't find any other references regarding them online, I found LOTS of negative reviews for pretty much every other plumber in the area. So Monday morning I gave them a call. I should have called them Saturday: they're working seven days a week because of demand and couldn't get to us until today.

Well, the guy finished about two hours ago. The water heater heats 36 gallons an hour, so I gave it an hour and took a shower: sheer bliss. After getting out, got the dishwasher started. Still have lots of dishes that need my attention, but it's a beginning.

Now to get on Yelp and other review sites and leave a very glowing review for them, and a very negative review for the plumber who has still not yet returned my call.
copperbadge: (Default)
[personal profile] copperbadge
I am like….90% sure I’m going camping this Friday. 

It depends a bit on the weather, but I’m mostly packed, I’ve cooked food that’s currently waiting in the freezer, and I have acquired the third Diane Mott Davidson book to read. 

The plan is to leave work early, catch the train to the campground, camp overnight, and in the morning hike out to a different train station further down the line, about a seven-mile trek, to do a longer endurance test than last weekend’s. Then I’ll catch the train home around noon on Saturday.

If something goes wrong, I can catch an evening train home on Friday until eight o’clock, or starting in the morning at 5:30, with little to no exertion. It’s pretty low-risk and I’m well stocked. I don’t have a sleeping pad, but my backpack has a partial one built-in, and I have one arriving tomorrow (though it might be too bulky, we’ll see). And honestly in this heat, I might just sleep on top of my sleeping bag in any case. 

Worst case scenario, the campground has heated, lockable shower cubicles with nice big floors. I’ve slept on worse. 

Caaaaaaamping! *jazz hands*

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starandrea: (Default)
[personal profile] starandrea
1) community wading pools
2) high spf long sleeve shirts
3) fresh fruit and almond butter biscuits

Asian Themed Post Apocalyptic Fantasy

Jul. 19th, 2017 02:56 pm
findthatbook: A pile of books. (Default)
[personal profile] oscarrob posting in [community profile] findthatbook
What I recall was Asian royalty living with space and privilege while cities were super crowded and couldn't be left. I think some part of the story revolved around discovery of what was beyond/under the city. This was a very long time ago, maybe more than 40 years that I read at least one of the series and its all very vague. An odd symbol on the front of the book and I want to say the author last name began with a W, but I can't be sure.

Wednesday Book Meme

Jul. 19th, 2017 01:44 pm
wendelah1: Sally from Peanuts looking at a shelf of books (book geek)
[personal profile] wendelah1
Because of all of the kids' books and quickie romances I've been reading lately, I am nine books ahead on my Goodreads challenge. I'm going to have to up the ante by ten books, at least, to compensate.

What I've finished

All the President's Men (1974), Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward. I began reading it because of (1.) this article in Newsweek: "The Eerie Similarities Between Alleged Trump Scandals and All The President's Men, and (2.) because we'd just watched the movie based on it. (Note that the Newsweek story was published back in March. Imagine if they'd written it this week.) The book is award-winning journalism but honestly, the movie makes for a better story. Go rent the movie. Download it. Whatever. (We checked it out of the library). You will not be sorry. The movie gets five stars. The book gets four stars. These reporters, their editors, and their publisher are all American heroes.

Beany and the Beckoning Road (1959), Lenore Mattingly Weber. Beany believes that she has lost boyfriend Norbett to another girl: Cynthia. She and Johnny plan to drive from Denver to California to return their nephew to his parents and advertise for passengers to share the travel expenses. What a surprise for Beany when she discovers that one of the passengers is Cynthia. What will happen to a mismatched set of passengers with very little money and a tomato plant in the back seat?

This was better than the previous book in the series. Beany flies off the handle one time too many for my taste but whatever. Three stars for retro-charm and that tomato plant. I haven't decided if I'm going to continue on with the Malone family, but this book was funny and engaging.

Girl in the Water (2016), Dana Marton. I took a chance and purchased (I know!) this book because of how much I liked Secret Soldier. The online reviews were enthusiastic, but I was not impressed. Marton tried to weave together three stories, and multiple points of view, and couldn't quite pull it off. spoilers ) I applaud her attempt to write something more ambitious than your run of the mill romance but this didn't work for me at all. I give it one star.

I returned Sugar and Other Stories (1987) by A.S. Byatt to the library after reading just one story. Actually, I didn't make it through the first story. I can't recall the title. It was about an unpleasant little girl, attending an atrocious boarding school, with nasty classmates and an appalling, sadistic headmistress, who I've decided in retrospect might be a stand-in for the writer. Byatt enjoys torturing her characters in much the same way that her headmistress character enjoyed torturing her students. Halfway through, I found I wasn't liking anything about this story. Enough was enough. I skimmed through the next two stories and they were more of the same. No, thank you.

What's next?

I borrowed another book in the time travel porn series from the LAPL. I think this one is called "The Slayer" but it has nothing to do with vampires.

I'm still rereading the series for my kidlit fic exchange, titles withheld.

I unearthed an old novel of Margaret Drabble's which I'd never read, The Peppered Moth.

I'm carrying around Mirror Dance from the Vorkosigan saga in my purse.

There's a stack of time travel novels from the library at my bedside.

Entering Space: Creating a Space-faring Civilization by Robert Zubrin is sitting around somewhere, too. I got it out of mothballs because there is a chapter on mining asteroids, which is relevant to my interests. Speaking of space-faring civilizations, season two of The Expanse arrived yesterday!

black kitty

Look what I found!

Jul. 19th, 2017 05:14 pm
author_by_night: (cool_large)
[personal profile] author_by_night
 Crack theories I wrote right before the seventh Harry Potter book came out!

And so commences a lot of nostalgia in the next couple of days. :P

(Obviously there are still spoilers for all books. Also, my current commentary will be in italics.)

Read more... )

The Weasleys (Prewetts?) are descended from Godric Gryffindor.
 
Why it almost works: The  Weasleys are as Gryffindor as it gets, from the good points to the bad, and they are fiercly pro-muggle, which certainly could've stemmed from something, right? Plus, that could also very well make the Blacks descendants, and wouldn't the irony of that be delicious? (Plus, it would work with my Sirius = desendant of Ayla and Jondalar crack fics I never wrote...) Finally, Ginny would've therefore technically been saved by the sword of her ancestor, another thing that would be cool. Not to mention the red hair - now, obviously, red hair isn't rare in Scotland, England, Ireland, Wales or anywhere else, Godric could've been from at that time (he could've been a Dane, and red hair is not uncommon in Denmark, from what I understand), not to mention the fact that a red hair gene carrying down so long would be hard, but it's still another tidbit. Um... not really, I listed about 87 reasons why that wasn't significant, but sure. Okay. :P
 
Why it still doesn't work as a whole: It just seems very, very far-fetched. Plus, I like Ron for being normal, and being a descendant would take away from that. Though conversely, it'd be nice for him to have something to be proud of, because I don't get the impression he feels proud of much. You can deny being a Chess pro or good at Quidditch, but you can't deny being the descendant of Godric Gryffindor. 
 
But again, it's just something that I feel is far-fetched.

Willy Widdershins was a cover up.
 
Why it almost works: Umbridge noted that he eavesdropped on the trio and the to-be DA in OoTP, and that was why he got away with hexing the toilets. But isn't it rather convenient that around the time there were "rumors" that Voldemort was back, a random wizard hexed muggle bathrooms?
 
We know Umbridge was willing to send Dementors after Harry. Why wouldn't she do more to make the MoM look good, to prove that any wizard could cause mayhem?
 
It's also possible that Lucius Malfoy bribed Willy Widdershins to take those actions. It would definitely bring attention away from the Death Eaters, no?
 
 Think of the general population reaction - "oh, it was some bloke with too much time on his hands, that other incident may have been too."
 
Why it still doesn't work as a whole: That plot died, so unless it comes back to haunt someone in a significant way, we won't need to know whether or not that's true. Also, if anything, it was probably a plot that was supposed to serve as a red herring - make the reader wonder if it was connected to Voldemort, when it really wasn't. And it was too a way for the DA to get caught.
 
Andromeda Tonks  knows something about Regulus that could be useful to finding out he is RAB.
 
Why it almost works: Harry is going to have to find out about the connection somehow. It is very possible that Andromeda Tonks knows something important - she may even know that Regulus destroyed the Horcruxes. She's also been alluded to, but never introduced, which seems strange.
 
Why it still doesn't work as a whole: At this point, introducing a whole new character and making her the key to a huge discovery for Harry would be pushing it. Why would it even occur to Harry to ask her, anyway? He'll more likely find out about RAB by Kreacher, Remus (who would  probably know his best friend's brother's  first and last initials), Tonks (as in, younger Auror Tonks) and/or by simple looking around. 

He DID find out through Kreacher!

The "other trio" will accompany Harry on the Horcrux Hunt, whether it takes place at Hogwarts or beyond. Took me a minute to realize I meant Luna, Neville and Ginny. Also LOL at  "The Horcrux Hunt."
 
Why it almost works: If it hadn't been for them, the DoM scene may have turned out quite differently. Luna, Neville and Ginny are extremely useful. And why give them plots if they won't be used again? They all have traits, too, that would be useful - Luna's tendency to accept things that are hard to accept could be an asset, for one. And they'll need Luna and Neville's gentle composures.
 
 
Why it still doesn't work as a whole: It's less that it doesn't work - it's more that it'd have to be done carefully, because in the end, it needs to be the trio. I'm not convinced it won't work, but I am convinced that it'll be less the other trio joining, and more that they help out as a seperate group, or that in the final battle, Ron and Hermione are present in helping directly but not the rest. They did lead La Resistance, though! (Luna, Neville and Ginny, that is.)
 

Crookshanks is Regulus.
 
Why it almost works: It definitely doesn't; the only place it belongs is in a badfic at the pit of voles. (Unless the author can write it very well.) But it's an amusing theory to cross your mind. I want crackfic now.

ETA: After writing this, I'm not sure "crack theories" is the right term, but they're still not ones I think are remotely canon.

Maybe "would be cool if this happened" theories? Although Regulus being Crookshanks was definitely a crack theory.

 

What were some of your old theories? (Both crack theories and serious ones?)

thewayne: (Default)
[personal profile] thewayne
Available on Archive.org. The first issue, dated February 1951, contains the Ray Bradbury story The Firemen, which he would later publish as the book Fahrenheit 451. These are available to read online or as free downloads in epub, Mobi and other formats. They're not formatted well, but they're perfectly readable. From the web site: "Galaxy Science Fiction was an American digest-size science fiction magazine, published from 1950 to 1980."

https://archive.org/details/galaxymagazine

Jul. 19th, 2017 12:27 pm
kittydesade: a bright red queen chess piece at the head of a diagonal line of white pawns on a white background (red queen running)
[personal profile] kittydesade
Well yesterday was a day of saying up too late the night before and then everything and its sibling happened at work and then I got home and ordered fucking pizza because fuck everything I did not have the energy to do dinner. I didn't even have the energy to do the day's writing. Or study languages or much of anything. Feh.

Today, okay, I still stayed up too late the night before playing silly games on my phone but I managed to get out the door intact and with my capoeira clothes, work is slower, writing is happening, and I might even get my Patreon up by the end of the week. I adjusted it back down to monthly and am working on reshaping the goals because if I'm describing myself as trying to replace income, that makes more sense than having it be per-creation. Also Patreon is absolute shite at explaining how per-creation works, and possibly shite at making per-creation work without charging people either more or less than they should be charged. Oy.

So, monthly it is. Which means figuring out what my expectations of myself are going to be and how to articulate it to my audience and so on. Possibly also figuring out how PHP and maybe a couple other languages work because I'll want to put in input forms on my website at some point. That's going to be fun.

Starlight, despite yesterday's exhausting clusterfuck of a day, is still continuing apace. [redacted] happened and there was much frenzied discussion of books and it looks like that's going to go smoothly up to the point where someone else has to decide that this is a worthy thing to happen, but I'm used to that. Thanks years of submitting novels and so on. I think I mentioned that I went to the second stage of PandaMoon submission slush pile, but in case I didn't, yes, I went to the second stage, word-vomited up some answers to some very silly questions, was complimented for my thoroughness, and now that's being read. I'm actually really pleased with Turing Shrugged so while I'm fairly uncaring whether it gets accepted or not, I'm... hm. What's the right description here? I give no fucks for pro publishing or self publishing but I'm proud to have submitted the best version of it that I had? Something like that. And pleased to be read and hope they like it but if they don't, reasonably sure it's because it's just not their cuppa rather than because I wrote a shitty novel. There's satisfaction in that.

Also I think Starlight will actually be finished, in a draft, by the end of the year because somehow I've gotten a lot better and a lot faster and more efficient at writing second drafts. Go figure. Hopefully a lot more efficient and faster at writing when I have an idea of the overall structure in general but that doesn't necessarily translate; an outline is a lot different than a first draft and it might take several tries to figure out where the fuck the story is supposed to go. Not there! Not there. Not there.

I actually feel okay about going to capoeira tonight. This may make the second night in a row considering I skipped Saturday because oh dear god between headache and all argh. What is this madness???

50 questions about books

Jul. 19th, 2017 09:13 am
thewayne: (Default)
[personal profile] thewayne
Thanks (and thanks a lot!) to [personal profile] stardreamer ;-)

1. You currently own more than 20 books:
When I was in primary school.

2. You currently own more than 50 books:
Before I graduated high school.

3. You currently own more than 100 books:
What a ridiculous question. There have been years that I've bought more than 100 books, though not recently

4. You amassed so many books you switched to an e-reader:
I didn't switch to an e-reader because of having so many books, but because of being a computer guy and wanting to investigate new tech. Started with a Palm Pilot, went to an iPad, went through a couple of Nooks along the way. Never messed with a Kindle because of a dislike of Amazon's control over the Whispernet.

5. You read so much you have a ton of books AND an e-reader:
Definitely. And now buying a vast majority in ebook format vs dead tree editions. But that's mainly because we're likely to be leaving the country in a few years and I DO NOT want to be shipping a proverbial, if not literal, ton of books if I can get rid of them. I have so many books that I loved when I was young, and treasure having read them, but have absolutely no interest in reading again.

There's a saying/story/whatever, it could actually be a Zen koan, about a person with a huge and impressive library. Someone asks the person if they've read all of those books. The reply is "Of course!" Or the reply is "Of course not!" Though my collection falls in to both camps, I think I want to be in the latter.

6. You have a book-organization system no one else understands:
Not really.

7. You're currently reading more than one book:
I frequently have multiple books in process, though sometimes books get started and never finished. I think the record holder is Don Quixote, I really should download a Gutenberg copy and add it to my phone.

8. You read every single day:
Most certainly.

9. You're reading a book right now, as you’re taking this book nerd quiz:
Simultaneously? Not hardly.

10. Your essentials for leaving the house:
This is not a simple question. If I'm doing errands locally that do not involve a sit-down meal, it's just me and my cell phone and perhaps a camera or two. If it involves going to the observatory or down the mountain to Alamogordo or further but not a long-distance trip, then add in more camera equipment, my iPad (always loaded with books), and maybe a book and my traveling game collection. A long-distance trip requires further analysis before packing is determined.

11. You've pulled an all-nighter reading a book:
I suppose, but very rarely and when I was much younger.

12. You did not regret it for a second and would do it again:
I probably did not regret it but also probably would not do it again at my age.

13. You've figured out how to incorporate books into your workout:
Like Star Dreamer said, workout?

14. You've declined invitations to social activities in order to stay home and read:
No. It is very rare that I would decline an invitation to a social activity.

15. You view vacation time as "catch up on reading" time:
No. I will always take books with me while traveling, but vacation is to have fun and photograph. When we went to Germany/Czechoslovakia in '15 I had LOTS of ebooks on both my iPad and my Chrome laptop, plus many more loaded in my Dropbox account as I knew I'd have lots of airplane time. But aside from hotel room time, I didn't spend a lot of time reading -- too much to see!

16. You've sat in a bathtub full of tepid water with prune-y skin because you were engrossed in a book:
Nope. If I'm in a tub, I'm soaking because of either sore muscles or sick lungs. I prefer showers. How my wife is willing to risk reading fanfic on a laptop in the tub is beyond me.

17. You've missed your stop on the bus or the train because you were engrossed in a book:
No.

18. You've almost tripped over a pothole, sat on a bench with wet paint, walked into a telephone pole, or narrowly avoided other calamities because you were engrossed in a book:
No, and people who don't pay attention to what they're doing and commit such acts should be publicly ridiculed.

19. You've laughed out loud in public while reading a book:
Certainly.

20. You've cried in public while reading a book (it’s okay, we won’t tell):
I don't think so, but possibly.

21. You're the one everyone goes to for book recommendations:
I have given recommendations before. The mother of a friend was a grade school teacher, and a student asked for some science fiction recommendations. Friend came to me. I made up a list, funneled it back, and later received a thank you note from the student!

22. You take your role in recommending books very seriously and worry about what books your friends would enjoy:
If asked, yes, I would take it seriously.

23. Once you recommend a book to a friend, you keep bugging them about it:
I wouldn't bug them, but I would ask them.

24. If your friend doesn't like the book you recommended, you're heartbroken:
I wouldn't be heartbroken, but I would be curious and would like to know so as to make a better recommendation. To each their own.

25. And you judge them.
Not hardly.

26. In fact, whenever you and a friend disagree about a book you secretly wonder what is wrong with them:
Not hardly.

27. You've vowed to convert a non-reader into a reader:
One year for my brother's birthday, I bought him a $25 book store gift card. He was heavily in to air brush and showed some talent. I thought he could get some magazines or a book on technique and learn some things. He doesn't read. He can read, he chooses not to. It went unused for ages, my mom finally gave it back to me and I got myself something. There's a line attributed to Mark Twain: The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read.

28. And you've succeeded:
N/A.

29. You've attended book readings, launches, and signings: Yes.
Yep. Hillary Clinton, Walter Cronkite, Leslie Nielson, Sir Terry Pratchett, to name a few.

30. You own several signed books:
Yep. Hillary Clinton, Walter Cronkite, Leslie Nielson, Sir Terry Pratchett, to name a few.

31. You would recognize your favorite authors on the street:
Some of them. Some I would hope not to as they are deceased.

32. In fact, you have:
Nope.

33. If you could have dinner with anybody in the world, you'd choose your favorite writer:
Probably not.

34. You own a first-edition book:
Many.

35. You know what that is and why it matters to bibliophiles:
Yes.

36. You tweet, post, blog, or talk about books every day:
No. I talk about them often with my wife, but I wouldn't say daily.

37. You have a "favorite" literary prize:
No. I respect several, but I wouldn't call any a favorite.

38. And you read the winners of that prize every year:
Not really.

39. You've recorded every book you've ever read and what you thought of it:
I've started getting more consistent at doing that.

40. You have a designated reading nook in your home:
No. I wish I did, but I do not.

41. You have a literary-themed T-shirt, bag, tattoo, or item of home décor:
I have a few t-shirts. My favorite item is two USB flash drives that look like library card catalog drawers from the Unshelved Kickstarter drive.

42. You gave your pet a literary name:
Heh. Yeah, I'd say Dante is a literary name.

43. You make literary references and puns nobody else understands:
Oh, most certainly. And my wife has become a bit of a punner.

44. You're a stickler for spelling and grammar, even when you're just texting:
I do my best. My grammar is not perfect, but I do my best with spelling. Having a browser underline spelling errors certainly helps.

45. You've given books as gifts for every occasion:
For many occasions, yes. Every? No.

46. Whenever someone asks what your favorite book is, your brain goes into overdrive and you can't choose just one.
No. Too many different categories that have great books. Plus, tastes change. I loved Douglas Adams 30 years ago, now I view him as a one-trick pony who could have been so much more.

47. You love the smell of books:
Well, sorta. But not enough to prevent me from dumping most of my physical collection to clear space.

48. You've binge-read an entire series or an author's whole oeuvre in just a few days:
Definitely. But only for smaller series, say less than a dozen books. If I can't easily carry the entire series without a box, forget it. I've binged the Vorkosigan series, and very recently Elizabeth Moon's Vatta series in preparation for her (now released) new book.

49. You've actually felt your heart rate go up while reading an incredible book:
Certainly.

50. When you turn the last page of a good book, you feel as if you've finally come up for air and returned from a great adventure:
There have been books that I've read that were that good.
thewayne: (Default)
[personal profile] thewayne
You should take a look at your profile here. I was doing a little bit of editing on mine, and I noticed that my Interests did not come over! My LJ account is still active, so it was easy to copy, it annoyed me a bit nonetheless.

Jul. 19th, 2017 10:12 am
the_rck: (Default)
[personal profile] the_rck
I wasn't able to use the c-PAP at all last night because every time I put it on, I'd start sneezing in under a minute. The air blowing through made a particular bit of my sinuses itch like crazy. After I post this, I'm going to wash all of the gear and let it air dry. (I've got ten minutes left on the CD I'm listening to, and with Cordelia still in bed, I don't want to turn up the volume enough to be able to hear it in the kitchen).

I've been sneezing a bit, off and on, since I got up this morning. It hasn't been enough to make me worry, but it also hasn't quite gone away. I'm also now feeling sore from the walking I did on Monday. Walking is difficult because my calf muscles are trying to refuse to stretch at all.

I wrote 87 words last night. I'm hoping that this is the breakthrough I need in order to be able to get moving with the story as it's due Saturday. I also spent about ten minutes finding names for the OCs I know I'm going to need for my Captive Audience assignment.

I'd like to go out and do some Ingress this morning because some players from the other side came through and knocked over almost all of the portals in the neighborhood. I managed to reinforce three that are difficult to attack without tramping over uneven ground (these folks were out well after dark and tend not to want to get out of their car(s) at the nature center), but there's one unclaimed portal now that is easy to knock down from the parking lot but can't be captured from there. One only has to venture about two yards onto the grass to reach it, but... Most people don't bother.

I probably won't end up going because I've only got an hour before a friend comes over and because I need to do several household chores first. If Cordelia wakes in time, I want to see if she has dishes lurking in her room. I'm hoping to run the dishwasher soon. There's not a lot of space left. I could fill it with a couple of mugs. I'd just like to give priority to bowls and/or plates if she's got them.

I need to put in a support request at AO3 because there's a comment on one of my fics that never got emailed to me. I've gotten emails for more than a dozen comments left after it was and for one left seven hours before on the same fic. It's been three days, so I don't think it's just delayed. It's not in my junk mail, and I checked Gmail just in case it was getting hung up there (occasionally, that account just won't download for a few hours at a time), but it's definitely not there. It's not utterly lost because it's in my AO3 inbox and on the fic, but... I like to archive comments locally.
ruuger: My hand with the nails painted red and black resting on the keyboard of my laptop (Default)
[personal profile] ruuger
Don't mind me, just slowly making my way through my episodic notes...

Extremis )

The Pyramid at the End of the World )

The Lie of the Land )

when talking about a cock...

Jul. 19th, 2017 06:27 am
chanter_greenie: a Pringles can with the words 'you can't write just one' written across it (drabbles are like pringles)
[personal profile] chanter_greenie
This is specific to fic, for the record.

Please, do not
cut for the aforementioned penis discussion )

That is sharding well all! :P
selenak: (Default)
[personal profile] selenak
For once, I manage to write my book reviews on a Wednesday.

Sam Bourne: To Kill the President

It was to be expected: the first Donald Trump era thriller (that I've read). Which takes full advantage of the fact that when previously any critic worth their salt would have complained about the one dimensional characterisation of the villains and the lack of realism in the US voting someone like that into power and then the Republican Party falling in line, followed by no checks and balances from any institution after even the Supreme Court caves due to the stolen seat being filled by the new President's choice, now all this looks like, well, realism.

Spoilers from an age where reality beggars caricature )


Philip Kerr: March Violets.

This is the first novel of a mystery series which I heard/read about via The New Yorker. The article in question was enthusiastic enought to overcome my instinctive squick at the premise, to wit: hard-boiled/noir detective novel set in the Third Reich. Basically, what if Philip Marlowe was German? Wandering those mean streets as a cynic with an ethical core takes a whole new meaning if the authories aren't just corrupt but a dictatorship preparing for war and genocide. Our hero is Bernie Gunther, former policeman who quit the force in 1933 for the obvious reason given that the novel positions he has ethics, and became a private investigator instead. Kerr serves up all the usual hard boiled/ noir tropes - untrustworthy millionaire clients, corrupt cops, shady dames -, complete with Chandleresque language, and he did his research - the novel's setting is Berlin in 1936, around the Olympic Games, and in addition to the well drawn Berlin geography, there are some great nods to Fritz Lang's movie M via some of the supporting cast, gangsters (given that Bernie Gunther originally gets hired to recover some diamonds, though of course it turns out it's far more complicated and what everyone is after is something else altogether. The brief appearances by historic figures (Göring and Heydrich, to be precise) are drawn credibly, which is to say their vileness comes across without Kerr employing sledge-hammery moustache twirling; in fact, he uses Göring's bonhommie manners to make him chilling.

As opposed to To Kill a President, this actually is a good novel. But. I still struggle somewhat with the basic premise. This is the first novel of what according ot the New Yorker article I'd read are twelve so far, and already I'm having to suspend disbelief about Bernie's continued survival. There's no reason why Heydrich at the end of this first novel shouldn't have gotten him killed, for example. And since we're in 1936, Bernie would still have the possibility to leave the country, and given what happens to him in this novel, it's hard to wonder why he doesn't, given he has no dependants who'd suffer for it. Yes, the decision to emigrate wasn't as easy as hindsight would have it if you weren't rich and didn't have friends abroad, but again, some truly harrowing things happen to Bernie in this novel which would serve as an incentive to get the hell out of Germany if ever there was one beyond the general situation of the country.

With this caveat, I'll keep reading.

hi!

Jul. 19th, 2017 02:01 am
2017revival: Animated icon advising that DW is "not just for queer|fannish|geeky|slash-writing|LJ-hating|godless so-and-sos anymore!" (Default)
[personal profile] reesespiecescat posting in [community profile] 2017revival
Name: Ciarra
Age: 24
Country: US
Subscription/Access Policy: Friend away! I'm always looking for new friends to talk to. As for access, I grant almost everyone that subscribes to me. If I ever lock something it'll be something really personal and might be trigger-y. I will always warn if I do post something of that nature. There's no pressure to grant me access back.

Fannish Interests: Gosh, okay, I like a lot of things. But I also need to catch up on a lot of things. That's my problem.

I watch a lot of tv. Right now I'm watching shadowhunters and deciding if I want to catch up on Teen Wolf or not. My love for Scott McCall is enternal though. 

I really enjoy pokemon,  digimon,  yugioh,  sailor moon, power rangers, tf&f series, harry potter, kingdom hearts, and classic spn. all of those were my fandoms before I ever knew what fandom meant. i am casually into new doctor who but Ten was my first doctor and my favorite era. I'm always there for the companions the most though and I love bill potts so much. i love sherlock holmes adaptations but i gotta say my favorite is elementary. i'm also into low energy video games so pretty much anything nintendo and the sims. I'm a little obsessed with the sims and the fandom it has on youtube. just a little. Superheroes are cool too! I like the mcu and dcu but i haven't watched all of it yet bc reasons. Omg star wars is a big one lately too. and the new Star Trek and hopefully the new series!! as for cartoons steven universe is like the best thing that ever happened to me probably. aaaand books!! gosh do i hope to actually start to read books. The last full thing I read that wasn't fanfiction was the hunger games.

sp in summary i love anything cheesy, ridiculous, and about friendship :D 

I Like To Post About: honestly? cute animals. cats especially. no but i'll post about all the things i care about and I might to do reaction posts to show or movie etc. I hope to at least post fic or a rec or just journaling in general! I'm trying to find my place in dreamwidth after being on tumblr for so long now. 

About Me/Other Info: I'm an ace nonbinary (she/they pronouns) lesbian. I'm autistic, mentally ill, and have chronic pain & illness. I'm infp, capricorn, and a hufflepuff. 

hurt/comfort is my whole life. It's like my one true kink. I love reading it, writing it, having discussions about it, reading meta about, you get it. It's my jam. 

I'll mostly comment on stuff for a while probably. I have a strict rule that is if I see an entry/read a fic/etc I comment on it. <3
starandrea: (Default)
[personal profile] starandrea
1) camp nanowrimo
2) blueberries
3) national park quarters from the denver mint

Blaaaa...

Jul. 18th, 2017 09:01 pm
koshka_the_cat: (Default)
[personal profile] koshka_the_cat
I wasted the entire night trying to get the turban for the beaded dress to work. To make myself feel better (or something) I tried wrapping the shawl that I've used as a turban before and wrapped it cutely in about a minute. I think trying to to it in voile or voile and silk was the issue. Oh well.

So I decided to go turbanless (I don't want the faux sequined shawl for this) and actually tried to do my hair. I never practice hair. But I found out that my tiny curling iron will curl my hair from straight, which is good. I may or may not wrap the strip of fabric I hemmed for the bird dress around my head. We will see.

The plan had been to make the pants for the beach pajamas. And fix the straps. I moved them a tiny bit after checking them and didn't check them again. Never a good plan!

But it's earlyish. I still may do something...

Jul. 18th, 2017 08:57 pm
the_rck: (Default)
[personal profile] the_rck
Has anyone here ever had issues with coins not surviving going through the laundry? I assumed, at first, that I was seeing some sort of play money* what with the dimes ending up looking the way they do-- They're smaller in circumference and have the outermost edge about twice as thick as the center in a slightly irregular way that looks like they've been smushed. Quarters come out looking right except that the ridging on the edges is completely gone. I think pennies are going the same way as dimes, and I haven't seen a nickel going through yet.

I'm trying to figure out how this can happen without whatever's doing it completely destroying our clothes or, you know, affecting them somehow. All the clothing seems to be fine.

Our washer and dryer are about twenty years old. We bought them new when we bought the house. The dryer uses natural gas.

*Cordelia says the weird coins are nothing to do with her.

Books Read 2017 - April - June

Jul. 18th, 2017 12:22 pm
thewayne: (Default)
[personal profile] thewayne
6/29 Too Like The Lightning, Ada Palmer (hf)
6/18 Ninefox Gambit, Yoon Ha Lee (hf)
6/15 The Obelisk Gate, NK Jemisin (hf, abandoned)
6/14 All the Birds in the Sky, Charlie Jane Anders (hf)
6/12 A Closed and Common Orbit, Becky Chambers (hf)
6/9 Guardian, Joe Haldeman

5/24 Through Five Administrations (ProjG), William Crook
5/20 In The Merde For Love (P), Clarke
5/16 Swords and Deviltry, Fritz Lieber
5/9 Master & Commander, Patrick O'Brian

4/28 Catch Me If You Can, Frank Abagnale
4/26 Alien Plot, Piers Anthony
4/26 Infinite Dreams, Joe Haldeman
4/22 To The Vanishing Point, Alan Dean Foster
4/17 Victory Conditions, Moon
4/16 Command Decision, Moon
4/13 Engaging the Enemy, Moon
4/11 Marque and Reprisal, Moon
4/8 Trading in Danger, Elizabeth Moon
4/6 A Year in the Merde, Stephen Clarke (p)
4/5 There Is No Darkness, Joe and Jack Haldeman

I've started doing some coding: (P) means physical copy, all others are ebooks. (ProjG) is from Project Gutenberg, and (HF) is Hugo Finalist. I only coded the novels even though I also read all of the novellas, novelettes, short stories, and Campbell nominees.

Like Movies, going from oldest to newest reads.

There Is No Darkness. Love me some Haldeman, and getting both brothers together is all the better. A novel set in a far space-flung future of a school traveling around, educating its student inhabitants. Quite a story, quite a commentary on culture.

A Year in the Merde is yet another Stephen Clarke comic French travelogue romance stories. They're lots of fun, lightweight reading. It's the first in the series about Paul West, a Brit marketing specialist who goes to Paris to consult in establishing a French chain of English tea rooms. It's a fish out of water series that's fun and weird, has a bit of a Pink Panther feel to it.

Elizabeth Moon's Vatta series: Trading in Danger, Marque and Reprisal, Engaging the Enemy, Command Decision, and Victory Conditions. Elizabeth Moon does an excellent job of writing space war. First off, she's an ex-Marine. She knows military training, procedure, and protocol. The books revolve around the Vatta family and their space shipping empire. Their daughter, Ky, is soon to graduate the space navy academy when a scandal gives her the choice: resign her commission and leave silently, or face a full courts martial an be stripped of her commission and thrown in the brig. She resigns. As she is a rated captain, her father gives her an old beater transport with a fairly simple task: take it on its final trade run then take it to the breakers and sell it for scrap. Buy tickets for the entire crew to come home. Of course, nothing can possibly be that simple. VERY bad things happen, enough to fill five books. I re-read them as Ms. Moon has released the sixth book of the series and I wanted to refamiliarize myself with the story, even though she insists that isn't strictly required. I'm very glad that I did as I had forgotten so much, and it is really an excellent series for the genre. Lots of character growth, lots of interesting space battles. She handles Newtonian motion in zero-G without getting bogged down in details like David Weber does in the Harrington books: some people like that, I tend to gloss over it. Anyway, definitely and enthusiastically recommended. The new book is Cold Welcome, it's book 1 of the Vatta's Peace series. She's on LJ at http://e-moon60.livejournal.com/ and her web site is at http://www.elizabethmoon.com/. She has a second space series known as the Serrano Legacy and an interesting magic/fantasy series known as Paksworld. Since I'm now finished with Hugo reading, I really should get ahold of Cold Welcome, though the new Charles Stross Laundry book should be arriving today....

To The Vanishing Point by Alan Dean Foster is one of his that I'd never heard of. An LA family has rented an RV and is driving to Las Vegas for vacation when they pick up a woman by the side of the road in the middle of the dessert. And their life changes forever! [cue ominous music] I've been a big Foster fan for a very long time, though I won't claim to have read everything he's written, nor do I try to, but this one is weird. The woman has one job in the world: to keep reality from unraveling. And now the family, through the act of picking her up, is part of that effort and has to see it through to the end. If they fail, reality falls in to chaos, perhaps forever. To be honest, this was not my cup of tea. It had interesting elements, but I just didn't care much for it.

Infinite Dreams, another Joe Haldeman. In this case, it is a collection of short stories. Lots of good stuff, too many to talk about specifics.

Alien Plot by Piers Anthony is another collection of short stories. I started reading Anthony ages ago: Xanth was a young series, I read the Bio of a Space Tyrant series, the Incarnations of Immortality series, the Blue Adept series, and I doubt I'll read anything else by him. I stopped reading him probably when he finished Incarnations of Immortality, I'd long-since stopped reading Xanth by then. And after reading Alien Plot: yeah, I think I'm done with him. My tastes have changed and there are a number of authors whom I really enjoyed when I was young that I just don't care for anymore.

Catch Me If You Can is Frank Abagnale's autobiography. He is an amazing person who evaded the FBI for years and has a Tom Hanks/Leo DiCaprio movie made about him of the same title detailing his exploits. He was an amazing hustler, an expert at acting like an airline pilot to cage free rides around the world, cashing bogus checks to fund his lifestyle. He figured out how to exploit weaknesses in the banking system, including how to make his own checks with magnetic ink to maximize the time it took to detect the forgery. Everything finally crashed down on him in France, where he spent several months in a horrible prison. He was released to be transferred to a Swedish prison for a year where he found out that he was about to be bounced from country to country where he'd committed fraud, unless a Swedish judge revoked his passport, in which case he'd be immediately flown to the USA to stand trial, and they wouldn't extradite him from there. When the plane came in for a landing at La Guardia, he exploited his knowledge of aircraft to go to the bathroom, remove the toilet from the floor, and escape. The service hatch frequently popped open on landing, triggering an idiot light in the cockpit, and it happened often enough that it was ignored. It wasn't looked in to until the plane had taxied to the terminal, at which point Frank had run across the airport and was long gone. I'd read this before and it is an amazing read. He never committed any violent crimes, just fraud. Highly recommended, and it'll probably put a smile on your face. Frank is now consulting to show businesses how to protect themselves against fraud and social engineering as he pretty much created that industry.

Master and Commander is the first book in the sea-faring series by Patrick O'Brian, which I had never touched until now. I quite enjoyed it, and now have a greater than zero understanding of nautical terms. Very good stuff, but I won't be pursuing the series very diligently. My wife has some of the Hornblower books, I might check in to those, and we'll see what my free/cheap ebook newsletters pop up.

Swords and Deviltry is the first Fafhred and the Grey Mouser book by Fritz Lieber. Classic sword and sorcery stuff, I devoured all of them when I was a teen and in my 20s. While it was fun to re-read this book, I have now re-read it and have no desire to re-read any more of them.

In The Merde For Love is the continuing adventures of Paul West in France by Stephen Clarke. Paul is now working on establishing his own tea shop in Paris, and trying to find love. Fun stuff, an interesting perspective of France and Paris.

Through Five Administrations by William Crook is a very unusual book. Crook was a Washington, DC policeman who was part of the protection detail for President Abraham Lincoln, he was not on duty the night that Lincoln was assassinated. This book is a memoir of his work in the White House of his work with Lincoln and the four subsequent administrations and their families. Quite an interesting perspective on the politics of the day, also an interesting alternative take on how English usage has changed over the last 150 years. And it's free online and for ebook readers through Project Gutenberg.

Guardian, another Joe Haldeman, is more fantasy than science fiction except that it deals in alternative universe theories of time/dimension travel. It starts right around the time of the Civil War and revolves around a woman and her son and their life that ultimately leads them to the Alaska Gold Rush. There's no hard, gadget-based, sci fi in this, so I lean towards classing it as fantasy with sci fi concepts. Very interesting stuff with some exploration of Alaskan myths. Haldeman lived there as a kid with his family for several years.

Now we get in to Hugo stuff!

A Closed and Common Orbit by Becky Chambers is the second volume following A Long Way to a Small and Angry Planet, which I read in late December. I really like Becky Chambers' writing, I find her description of the general environment to be kind of evocative of Firefly and Douglas Adams. This book is loosely a continuation of the first, but only loosely. At the end of the previous book, a mature AI dies and is reset and can't really continue where she's at as it distresses everyone around her. So she's put in to a body that does a remarkable job of simulating a human and goes off to live with a junker/tech who can help her adapt. Every other chapter is back-story of the tech, which is an interesting story device. The whole book is huge amounts of character growth, which I really liked. It's all about the AI re-learning who she is/was and learning to be a better person and the junker reclaiming part of her past. Very fun stuff, and I'm quite looking forward to the next book. The first book was self-published and could have benefited from some editing rigor. This book shows much more polish. I really look forward to seeing what Ms. Chambers comes up with in the future, she's on my Will Buy list.

All The Birds In The Sky by Jane Anders is a mix of science fiction and fantasy. A young girl learns that, in certain circumstances, she can talk to birds and apparently she's a witch. A young boy, who's more or less a tech genius, learns that the girl can provide him an alibi with his parents to make it look like he's being active outdoors. Years past and lots of things happen, including the ecological collapse of the planet. It's a bit of a downer, but very well crafted and quite interesting: I really enjoyed reading this book and it well-deserved the Hugo nod.

The Obelisk Gate by NK Jemison is book 2 in a series and I was not impressed. And I hate to say it, but I abandoned this book. I didn't want to, but she did was I've learned is an increasingly common literary trope: second person writing. You do this, you do that, you look there, you say this. That really put me off. But that wasn't all, it was just the story itself that did it. The story was too dependent on the first book to understand the environment and what was going on. It just wasn't my cup of tea. Regarding second person, when I got to the short stories I was reading one that was published in Uncanny called If You Stay Here You Shall Surely Drown, and it is also written in second person. I didn't mind that. It was more the story than the perspective of the narration that put me off. Besides, a story will be in last place, and if I like other books more, it won't take much to be knocked to the bottom.

Ninefox Gambit by Yoon Ha Lee was, excuse the profanity, absolutely fucking amazing. Space war plus Chinese dynastic stuff plus Chinese mysticism. Wow. It wasn't strictly speaking magic, but nigh unto. The empire and its armies/fleets strategies and tactics are based on calendrical cycles and geometry. Sort of the ultimate expression of horoscopes and feng shui. Geometry will determine battle formations, and breaking an enemy's formation can determine victory. Lee does not get bogged down in the numbers, which I appreciate. The core of the story is an officer sent on a special expedition to suppress some calendrical heretics which threaten the stability of the empire. To overcome them, they must resurrect the greatest traitor the empire has ever scene, who is also the greatest general. His consciousness has been preserved even though his body was destroyed. And since she suggested it, she gets to host him. And the heretical rebellion turns out to be much more than it seems. This is the first book of a series or trilogy, I'm not sure which. And it is really, REALLY good. This was a page turner for me, I look forward to reading more of them.

Too Like The Lightning by Ada Palmer was another WOW book. Palmer is also up for a Campbell award for Best New Author, and I think she stands a solid shot at it. Solid future earth science fiction, but also very different. It's also very hard to describe. It has a feel of Cory Doctorow, in that countries are no more, people can now identify themselves in multiple ways as member of multiple groups. This determines voting blocks and elections for leadership. It's kind of complicated. For example, one group controls all air car routing, another controls everything concerning space travel and anything outside of earth's atmosphere. Another with law enforcement between major clans. There is no longer such a thing as capital punishment. If someone commits murder, or even multiple murders, they're stripped of all affiliations and sentenced to manual labor as a Servitor for anyone who will have them. The people who have them working for them give them food for their labor: if they don't work, they don't eat. It's more complicated than that, but like I said, it's hard to describe and it takes a long time for it to be fully explained in the book. The plot of the book is a theft takes place. Each of the major clans publishes a list of their projection of what the vote results will be in the next leadership election. Very important stuff. The theft is from one of the most respected papers. There's no blackmail, no murder, just stealing a piece of paper. But it sends ripples throughout the world of the ruling elite. And as the book progresses, it turns more and more sordid. Very much looking forward to future books in the series.

Simply put, Too Like The Lightning and Ninefox Gambit are the two best books that I've read this year, and the year's just half over. Absolutely amazing. It makes me kick myself repeatedly that I haven't bought supporting memberships for Worldcon in the past, but I'll definitely get them in the future! Just too much good stuff, and too many authors to look forward to!
thewayne: (Default)
[personal profile] thewayne
News Thump is a very British parody site, not unlike The Onion. They do some very good work. I read them frequently, they do an excellent job of ripping Trump.

http://newsthump.com/2017/07/17/george-a-romero-probably-dead/


I'm reminded of a story of Vincent Price and Peter Lorre attending the funeral of Bella Lugosi, allegedly true: Peter turned to Vincent and whispered "Should we drive a stake through his heart, just to make sure?"

Spider-man: Homecoming (Film Review)

Jul. 18th, 2017 05:43 pm
selenak: (Henry Hellrung by Imaginary Alice)
[personal profile] selenak
Okay, that's it. As Civil War made me suspect, Tom Holland is my platonic ideal of Peter Parker, at least in his teenage phase. Also, while I had liked the first Raimi/Maguire movie and parts of the rest while increasingly disliking other parts of those films, and liked the first Garfield without thinking it needed to exist while extremly disliking the second one, this latest cinematic go at Spidey was a complete delight to me and I love it.

Ramblings beneath the cut )

Jul. 18th, 2017 12:54 pm
the_rck: (Default)
[personal profile] the_rck
I keep losing track of what day of the week it is, and, probably because of the story that needs to get done, I have the constant feeling that I'm forgetting something important that I need to get done right this second. I actually don't have anything at all scheduled for the rest of the week, so I'm not actually forgetting an appointment or anything.

We discovered last night at about 9 that we have no bread type stuff usable for Scott's sandwiches. The rye bread was moldy. The burger buns were moldy. The two remaining bagels weren't, but for some reason, Scott didn't want cheese and turkey and chocolate. I suggested cashew butter and jam, but he decided to take meatloaf instead.

The meatloaf isn't exactly right this time. It's edible, but I put in too much teriyaki sauce because I lost control while pouring it in. I had to add a lot of extra oatmeal to balance the wetness, but there wasn't much I could do about the flavor. For some reason that I can't recall now, I also added dill. The combination of dill and teriyaki isn't bad, but it is completely unexpected and so a little disconcerting.

We still have half of the package of ground turkey left, and I should cook that today. I'm just not sure what I want to do with it. Maybe I can scrounge the ingredients to make some sort of soup either in the pressure cooker or in the crock pot? I know how to do it in the crock pot but that would require getting the dratted thing out and finding a place for it to sit and all of that. I think I'll see if there are any decent soup recipes for the pressure cooker.

There's going to be a local to us anomaly for Ingress in late August. I'm in the process of signing up for it, but I'm not sure how much I'll be able to do, given how variable my energy levels and such tend to be.

On the bright side, I'm no longer sore from yesterday's excursion. I had trouble walking for most of the evening, but I'm doing about as usual now. Which means I still hurt. I just don't hurt extra from having been stupid.

I currently only have two library books that can't be renewed. One is due this weekend. The other is newly checked out, so I have a couple of days shy of four weeks to finish it.

Today's To Do List )
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
They were already a bit more semi than feral, and now they've been upgraded! Nellie is Sociable, and Kid Blink is Friendly But Shy. It is crucially important that we don't fall into the trap of giving Nellie more attention just because she is friendlier.

***********


Found: A Letter to the Future From 1995

Your car has just been crushed by hagfish: Frequently Asked Questions

More Than Bread: Sourdough As a Window Into The Microbiome

A Window Into Windex

How Cellophane Changed the Way We Shop for Food

Scientists marvel at creatures' 'precise' body clock

Hyenas spark admiration, not fear, in Ethiopia's Harar city

Marrying Later, Staying Single Longer (Nifty animated graphs!)

The Power of Inclusive Sex Education

Tech giant releasing 20 million mosquitoes in Fresno; that's a good thing, really

Tribes commit to uphold Paris climate agreement

Under siege by liberals: the town where everyone owns a gun

The Myth of Drug Expiration Dates

Swiss glacier yields bodies of couple missing for 75 years

The Prisoner Who Painted Dachau’s Horrors (Some of the paintings are reproduced in the article.)

Puerto Rico economic crisis hits island's only zoo

The Summer of Misreading Thucydides

'Inappropriate' and 'Insulting.' Most Americans Disapprove of Trump's Twitter Use

More hospital closings in rural America add risk for pregnant women

Republican attempts to replace Obamacare fail

Separatists proclaim a new state to replace Ukraine

A video of a woman in a skirt sparks outrage in Saudi Arabia

Australians see woman's shooting by police as US nightmare

Children of the Opioid Epidemic Are Flooding Foster Homes. America Is Turning a Blind Eye.

'It's raining needles': Drug crisis creates pollution threat

UAE orchestrated hacking of Qatari government sites, sparking regional upheaval, according to U.S. intelligence officials

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